Magda Indigo photography

+ THE PHYSALIS COLLECTION

THE LITTLE LANTERNS...PHYSALIS
THE INDIVIDUALIST… PHYSALIS
THE CHANGING of THE COLOURS...PHYSALIS
FILIGREE… A JEWEL, Physalis
TO BE AND NOT TO BE... Physalis
ALL ASPECTS of PHYSALIS…
TANGIBLE EDIBLES, PHYSALIS...
QUATTRO… PHYSALIS
PAS de DEUX... Physalis
FOUR of A KIND… PHYSALIS
BIM... BAM... BOM... PHYSALIS
SONG for AUTUMN... PHYSALIS
OF HALLOWEEN CROSSES and COLOURS… Physalis
THE LITTLE LANTERNS... PHYSALIS
DINGELING… PHYSALIS
OCTOBERFEST…

THE LITTLE LANTERNS...PHYSALIS

PLEASE READ THIS: MY PHOTOS ARE ONLY FOR SALE DIRECTLY FROM ME! PHYSALIS alkekengi or Chinese Lantern Plant, they are native from southern Europe east across southern Asia to Japan. Popular for the papery bright-orange lantern pods that develop around the ripening fruit, these are often cut and used for Thanksgiving and Halloween arrangements. Plants are aggressive spreaders, and best kept out of the perennial border so they don't take over. Also can be grown in tubs. Small white flowers appear in midsummer, over a bushy mound of coarse green leaves. Pods are green at first, but should be harvested as soon as the orange colour develops, the leaves stripped then stems hung upside down to dry in a warm dark room. Thank you for ALL your faves and comments, M, (* _ *) For more of my other work or if you want to purchase, visit here: www.indigo2photography.co.uk IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

THE INDIVIDUALIST… PHYSALIS

you will encounter the individualist everywhere! One who does not ‘follow’, is innovative and creative, not once but continuously? I often get the comment: ‘simple’ on my images, LOL. Yes that makes me smile, I remember Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly and so many more, … it looked so simple and easy what they did, you know, like you could get up and dance in the same way… NOT! I experience the same with my work… it gets copied and tried, never seem to achieve that same depth, the tonalities, the richness and the emotion. I get asked repeatedly for workshops and tutorials. For which I have no time I’m happy to say, so much work, euhh, rephrase that, pleasure and fun? What you see in my images is the years of experimenting, the years of studying, the years of experience! Thanx for your time and comments, greatly appreciated, M, (*_*) For more of my other work or if you want to purchase, visit here: www.indigo2photography.com IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

THE CHANGING of THE COLOURS...PHYSALIS

PLEASE READ THIS: MY PHOTOS ARE ONLY FOR SALE DIRECTLY FROM ME! Autumn and the colours are changing, in an apotheose of brilliance and abundance of colour. PHYSALIS alkekengi or Chinese Lantern Plant, they are native from southern Europe east across southern Asia to Japan. Popular for the papery bright-orange lantern pods that develop around the ripening fruit, these are often cut and used for Thanksgiving and Halloween arrangements. Plants are aggressive spreaders, and best kept out of the perennial border so they don't take over. Also can be grown in tubs. Small white flowers appear in midsummer, over a bushy mound of coarse green leaves. Pods are green at first, but should be harvested as soon as the orange colour develops, the leaves stripped then stems hung upside down to dry in a warm dark room. Thank you for ALL your faves and comments, M, (* _ *) For more of my other work or if you want to purchase, visit here: www.indigo2photography.co.uk IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

FILIGREE… A JEWEL, Physalis

Yes, Nature creates its own jewellery. A skeleton of Physalis, the small shrivelled fruit captured inside the fine lacy filigreed petals. Discovered this in my friends garden, she plucked it and carefully wrapped it. It survived the travels well. PHYSALIS alkekengi or Chinese Lantern Plant, they are native from southern Europe east across southern Asia to Japan. Popular for the papery bright-orange lantern pods that develop around the ripening fruit, these are often cut and used for Thanksgiving and Halloween arrangements. Plants are aggressive spreaders, and best kept out of the perennial border so they don't take over. Also can be grown in tubs. Small white flowers appear in midsummer, over a bushy mound of coarse green leaves. Pods are green at first, but should be harvested as soon as the orange colour develops, the leaves stripped then stems hung upside down to dry in a warm dark room. Thank you for ALL your faves and comments, M, (* _ *) For more of my other work or if you want to purchase, visit here:

TO BE AND NOT TO BE... Physalis

JEWELS, Physalis Yes, Nature creates its own jewellery. A skeleton of Physalis, the small shrivelled fruit captured inside the fine lacy filigreed petals. Discovered this in my friends garden, she plucked it and carefully wrapped it. It survived the travels well. PHYSALIS alkekengi or Chinese Lantern Plant, they are native from southern Europe east across southern Asia to Japan. Popular for the papery bright-orange lantern pods that develop around the ripening fruit, these are often cut and used for Thanksgiving and Halloween arrangements. Plants are aggressive spreaders, and best kept out of the perennial border so they don't take over. Also can be grown in tubs. Small white flowers appear in midsummer, over a bushy mound of coarse green leaves. Pods are green at first, but should be harvested as soon as the orange colour develops, the leaves stripped then stems hung upside down to dry in a warm dark room. Thank you for ALL your faves and comments, M, (* _ *) For more of my other work or if you want to purchase, visit here: www.indigo2photography.com IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

ALL ASPECTS of PHYSALIS…

Yes, Nature creates its own jewellery. A skeleton of Physalis, the small shrivelled fruit captured inside the fine lacy filigreed petals. Edible Physalis: in the green husk here: it is characterised by the small orange fruit similar in size, shape and structure to a small tomato, but partly or fully enclosed in a large papery husk derived from the calyx. The berry also goes by the names Golden Strawberry,Chinese Lantern and Cape gooseberry, and tastes like strawberries or pineapple in flavour, with a mild acidity. The decorative species are grown as ornamental plants. For example, the hardy Physalis alkekengi has edible small fruits but is most popular for its large, bright orange to red husks. Thank you for ALL your faves and comments, M, (* _ *) For more of my other work or if you want to purchase, visit here: www.indigo2photography.com IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

TANGIBLE EDIBLES, PHYSALIS...

Physalis is characterised by the small orange fruit similar in size, shape and structure to a small tomato, but partly or fully enclosed in a large papery husk derived from the calyx. The berry also goes by the names Golden Strawberry,Chinese Lantern and Cape gooseberry. Not all Physalis species bear edible fruit. Select species are cultivated for their edible fruit, however; the typical Physalis fruit is similar to a firm tomato in texture, and like strawberries or pineapple in flavour, with a mild acidity. Physalis fruit is a good source of vitamin C, beta-carotene, iron, calcium and trace amounts of B vitamins. These fruits contain 18 kinds of amino acids . These berries are also abundant in polysaccharides, compounds that may help fortify the immune system. Thanx, M, (~ _ *) For more of my other work or if you want to PURCHASE (ONLY PLACE TO BUY!), visit here: www.indigo2photography.co.uk IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

QUATTRO… PHYSALIS

I love Physalis. Both to eat and to photograph! Physalis is characterised by the small orange fruit similar in size, shape and structure to a small tomato, but partly or fully enclosed in a large papery husk derived from the calyx. The berry also goes by the names Golden Strawberry,Chinese Lantern and Cape gooseberry. Not all Physalis species bear edible fruit. Select species are cultivated for their edible fruit, however; the typical Physalis fruit is similar to a firm tomato in texture, and like strawberries or pineapple in flavour, with a mild acidity. Physalis fruit is a good source of vitamin C, beta-carotene, iron, calcium and trace amounts of B vitamins. These fruits contain 18 kinds of amino acids . These berries are also abundant in polysaccharides, compounds that may help fortify the immune system. Thanx for your time and comments, greatly appreciated, M, (*_*) For more of my other work or if you want to purchase, visit here: www.indigo2photography.com IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

PAS de DEUX... Physalis

Physalis is characterised by the small orange fruit similar in size, shape and structure to a small tomato, but partly or fully enclosed in a large papery husk derived from the calyx. The berry also goes by the names Golden Strawberry or Chinese Lantern. Physalis fruit is a good source of vitamin C, beta-carotene, iron, calcium and trace amounts of B vitamins. These have been used as a diuretic in traditional medicine, although there is no scientific data to support this. These fruits contain 18 kinds of amino acids . These berries are also abundant in polysaccharides, compounds that may help fortify the immune system. Thanx, M, (~ _ *) For more of my other work or if you want to PURCHASE (ONLY PLACE TO BUY!), visit here: www.indigo2photography.co.uk IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

FOUR of A KIND… PHYSALIS

a lifespan… A skeleton of Physalis, the small shrivelled fruit captured inside the fine lacy filigreed petals. Edible Physalis: in the green husk here: it is characterised by the small orange fruit similar in size, shape and structure to a small tomato, but partly or fully enclosed in a large papery husk derived from the calyx. The berry also goes by the names Golden Strawberry,Chinese Lantern and Cape gooseberry, and tastes like strawberries or pineapple in flavour, with a mild acidity. The decorative species are grown as ornamental plants. For example, the hardy Physalis alkekengi has edible small fruits but is most popular for its large, bright orange to red husks. A skeleton of Physalis, the small shrivelled fruit captured inside the fine lacy filigreed petals. Thank you for ALL your faves and comments, M, (* _ *) For more of my other work or if you want to purchase, visit here: www.indigo2photography.com IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

BIM... BAM... BOM... PHYSALIS

PLEASE READ THIS: MY PHOTOS ARE ONLY FOR SALE DIRECTLY FROM ME! I take my photography very serious! But I have also kept a much needed sense of humour in my life! I see that too many photos are so serious and angsty? PHYSALIS alkekengi or Chinese Lantern Plant, they are native from southern Europe east across southern Asia to Japan. Popular for the papery bright-orange lantern pods that develop around the ripening fruit, these are often cut and used for Thanksgiving and Halloween arrangements. Plants are aggressive spreaders, and best kept out of the perennial border so they don't take over. Also can be grown in tubs. Small white flowers appear in midsummer, over a bushy mound of coarse green leaves. Pods are green at first, but should be harvested as soon as the orange colour develops, the leaves stripped then stems hung upside down to dry in a warm dark room. Thank you for ALL your faves and comments, M, (* _ *) For more of my other work or if you want to purchase, visit here: www.indigo2photography.co.uk IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

SONG for AUTUMN... PHYSALIS

PLEASE READ THIS: MY PHOTOS ARE ONLY FOR SALE DIRECTLY FROM ME! When I saw this, they became wind-dancers, I heard music, they were musical notes, oh, my imagination running wild again! LOL I take my photography very serious! But I have also kept a much needed sense of humour in my life! PHYSALIS alkekengi or Chinese Lantern Plant, they are native from southern Europe east across southern Asia to Japan. Popular for the papery bright-orange lantern pods that develop around the ripening fruit, these are often cut and used for Thanksgiving and Halloween arrangements. Plants are aggressive spreaders, and best kept out of the perennial border so they don't take over. Also can be grown in tubs. Small white flowers appear in midsummer, over a bushy mound of coarse green leaves. Pods are green at first, but should be harvested as soon as the orange colour develops, the leaves stripped then stems hung upside down to dry in a warm dark room. Thank you for ALL your faves and comments, M, (* _ *) For more of my other work or if you want to purchase, visit here: www.indigo2photography.co.uk IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

OF HALLOWEEN CROSSES and COLOURS… Physalis

We come to the finale of the fruit and nut harvesting! Large papery husks derive from the calyx. The berry inside, also goes by the names Golden Strawberry,Chinese Lantern and Cape gooseberry. Not all Physalis species bear edible fruit. This here is decorative. Any sort of religious symbol might deter a vampire… Have you ever wondered about the origin of Halloween colours? It is the custom of the celebration to use orange and black in decorations and costumes. The colour orange also signifies strength and endurance. We don’t know if that is for the holiday or strength and endurance at the harvest time. Since the Celtics were involved in wars with Julius Caesar, they may have believed orange gave courage to those who wore that colour during battle. As the Celtics are given the most credit for beginning the holiday as the festival of the harvest, a colour of autumn is used. Orange, being the most prevalent autumn tone, is derived from the pumpkin and leaves. In the final confrontation with Dracula, Van Helsing, finding himself in a showdown without any weapons, grabs two nearby candelabras and holds them up in the shape of a cross, which repels the Count. This scene created a visual trope since adopted by many other cinematic slayers: since then, we have seen characters use whatever is at hand from baseball bats and even two of their own fingers—to form an impromptu cross. Thanx for your time and comments, greatly appreciated, M, (*_*) For more of my other work or if you want to purchase, visit here: www.indigo2photography.com IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

THE LITTLE LANTERNS... PHYSALIS

PHYSALIS alkekengi or Chinese Lantern Plant, they are native from southern Europe east across southern Asia to Japan. Popular for the papery bright-orange lantern pods that develop around the ripening fruit, these are often cut and used for Thanksgiving and Halloween arrangements. Plants are aggressive spreaders, and best kept out of the perennial border so they don't take over. Also can be grown in tubs. Small white flowers appear in midsummer, over a bushy mound of coarse green leaves. Pods are green at first, but should be harvested as soon as the orange colour develops, the leaves stripped then stems hung upside down to dry in a warm dark room. Thank you for ALL your faves and comments, M, (* _ *) For more of my other work or if you want to purchase, visit here: www.indigo2photography.com IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

DINGELING… PHYSALIS

I take my photography very serious! But I have also kept a much needed sense of humour in my life! PHYSALIS alkekengi or Chinese Lantern Plant, they are native from southern Europe east across southern Asia to Japan. Popular for the papery bright-orange lantern pods that develop around the ripening fruit, these are often cut and used for Thanksgiving and Halloween arrangements. Plants are aggressive spreaders, and best kept out of the perennial border so they don't take over. Also can be grown in tubs. Small white flowers appear in midsummer, over a bushy mound of coarse green leaves. Pods are green at first, but should be harvested as soon as the orange colour develops, the leaves stripped then stems hung upside down to dry in a warm dark room. Thank you for ALL your faves and comments, M, (* _ *) For more of my other work or if you want to purchase, visit here: www.indigo2photography.co.uk IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

OCTOBERFEST…

I don’t know about you, but hmmm, every season has its charms? Each their colours… not that Spring doesn’t have orange or Summer doesn’t have greens, I think it much lies in the ‘combination’ of colours? And this here is pure Autumn! Some bright orange Physalis, some cobnuts (fresh Hazelnuts) and a green ‘decorative’ fruits… et voila, Autumn in the studio. Having a lovely w-e? Thank you for your comments and time, M, (*_*) For more of my other work or if you want to purchase, visit here: www.indigo2photography.com IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved