Magda Indigo photography

+ THE POINSETTIA COLLECTION

NOT FOR CHRISTMAS, POINSETTIA…
THE FLOWERS in the STAR…
THE COLOURS of CHRISTMAS... POINSETTIA
THE COLOURS of CHRISTMAS... POINSETTIA
POINSETTIA...THE COLOURS of THE SEASON
POINSETTIA...THE COLOURS of THE SEASON.
A CHRISTMAS STAR... Poinsettia
IT’S BEGINNING TO LOOK…
ONE POINSETTIA LEAF…

NOT FOR CHRISTMAS, POINSETTIA…

#abfav_lines_stripes This is the palest pink poinsettia I ever saw! But for me, for the festive season definitely red! Euphorbia pulcherrima is a shrub or small tree, typically reaching a height of 0.6–4 metres (2 ft 0 in–13 ft 1 in). The plant bears dark green dentate leaves that measure 7–16 centimetres (2.8–6.3 in) in length. The coloured bracts —which are most often flaming red but can be orange, pale green, cream, pink, white, or marbled—are often mistaken for flower petals because of their groupings and colours, but are actually leaves. The colours of the bracts are created through photoperiodism, meaning that they require darkness (12 hours at a time for at least five days in a row) to change colour. At the same time, the plants require abundant light during the day for the brightest colour. The flowers of the poinsettia are unassuming and do not attract pollinators. They are grouped within small yellow structures found in the centre of each leaf bunch, and are called cyathia.] The poinsettia is native to Mexico. It is now found in the wild in deciduous tropical forests at moderate elevations from southern Sinaloa down the entire Pacific coast of Mexico to Chiapas and Guatemala. May your w-e and the coming days be full of goodness and joy, Magda (*_*) For more of my other work or if you want to PURCHASE (ONLY PLACE TO BUY MY IMAGES!), VIEW THE NEW PORTFOLIOS AND LATEST NEWS HERE on our website: www.indigo2photography.com IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

THE FLOWERS in the STAR…

This is the palest pink poinsettia I ever saw! The tiny flowers in the middle of the pink star look like little mouths? Euphorbia pulcherrima is a shrub or small tree, typically reaching a height of 0.6–4 metres (2 ft 0 in–13 ft 1 in). The plant bears dark green dentate leaves that measure 7–16 centimetres (2.8–6.3 in) in length. The coloured bracts —which are most often flaming red but can be orange, pale green, cream, pink, white, or marbled—are often mistaken for flower petals because of their groupings and colours, but are actually leaves. The colours of the bracts are created through photoperiodism, meaning that they require darkness (12 hours at a time for at least five days in a row) to change colour. At the same time, the plants require abundant light during the day for the brightest colour.[ The flowers of the poinsettia are unassuming and do not attract pollinators. They are grouped within small yellow structures found in the center of each leaf bunch, and are called cyathia.] The poinsettia is native to Mexico. It is now found in the wild in deciduous tropical forests at moderate elevations from southern Sinaloa down the entire Pacific coast of Mexico to Chiapas and Guatemala. It is also found in the interior in the hot, seasonally dry forests of Guerrero, Oaxaca, and Chiapas. May your w-e and the coming days be full of goodness and joy, Magda (*_*) For more of my other work or if you want to PURCHASE (ONLY PLACE TO BUY MY IMAGES!), VIEW THE NEW PORTFOLIOS AND LATEST NEWS HERE on our website: www.indigo2photography.com IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

THE COLOURS of CHRISTMAS... POINSETTIA

I'm quite traditional, green and red are THE colours for Christmas, of course with some silver and some gold, often white included, all depending on my creative mood... This Poinsettia is a Euphorbia pulcherrima. The plant's association with Christmas began in 16th century Mexico, where legend tells of a young girl who was too poor to provide a gift for the celebration of Jesus' birthday. The tale goes that the child was inspired by an angel to gather weeds from the roadside and place them in front of the church altar. Crimson "blossoms" sprouted from the weeds and became beautiful poinsettias. From the 17th century, Franciscan friars in Mexico included the plants in their Christmas celebrations. The star-shaped leaf pattern is said to symbolise the Star of Bethlehem, and the red colour represents the blood sacrifice through the crucifixion of Jesus...Where I come from, we call this a 'Christmas Star' There is a common misconception that the poinsettia is highly toxic. This is not true; it is mildly irritating to the skin or stomach and may sometimes cause diarrhoea and vomiting if eaten. As with all Euphorbias, they bruise easily and give off a white 'milk' when broken, so those sensitive to latex may suffer an allergic reaction. I wish you all the very best, and thanx for all your kind words, time, comments and faves. Very much appreciated. M, (*_*) For more of my other work visit here: www.indigo2photography.co.uk IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

THE COLOURS of CHRISTMAS... POINSETTIA

For December I'll upload images to do with the festive season. This is going to be many different things as you can see... I'm quite traditional, green and red are THE colours for Christmas, of course with some silver and some gold, often white included, all depending on my creative mood... This Poinsettia is a Euphorbia pulcherrima. The ‘flower’ is in the centre. The plant's association with Christmas began in 16th century Mexico, where legend tells of a young girl who was too poor to provide a gift for the celebration of Jesus' birthday. The tale goes that the child was inspired by an angel to gather weeds from the roadside and place them in front of the church altar. Crimson "blossoms" sprouted from the weeds and became beautiful poinsettias. From the 17th century, Franciscan friars in Mexico included the plants in their Christmas celebrations. The star-shaped leaf pattern is said to symbolise the Star of Bethlehem, and the red colour represents the blood sacrifice through the crucifixion of Jesus...Where I come from, we call this a 'Christmas Star' There is a common misconception that the poinsettia is highly toxic. This is not true; it is mildly irritating to the skin or stomach and may sometimes cause diarrhoea and vomiting if eaten. As with all Euphorbias, they bruise easily and give off a white 'milk' when broken, so those sensitive to latex may suffer an allergic reaction. I wish you all the very best, and thanx for all your kind words, time, comments and faves. Very much appreciated. M, (*_*) For more of my other work visit here: www.indigo2photography.com IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

POINSETTIA...THE COLOURS of THE SEASON

PLEASE READ THIS: MY PHOTOS ARE ONLY FOR SALE DIRECTLY FROM ME! A LIVE plant, after the studio it looks like silk? Nowadays, like in everything, there are 'trends'? This year, black trimmings seem to be the latest rage, the MUST HAVE! Me, I'm more traditional, green and red are THE colours for Christmas, of course with some silver and some gold, often white included, all depending on my creative mood... It probably originates in my childhood, but yes, to me, this is it! This Poinsettia is a Euphorbia pulcherrima. The plant's association with Christmas began in 16th century Mexico, where legend tells of a young girl who was too poor to provide a gift for the celebration of Jesus' birthday. The tale goes that the child was inspired by an angel to gather weeds from the roadside and place them in front of the church altar. Crimson "blossoms" sprouted from the weeds and became beautiful poinsettias. From the 17th century, Franciscan friars in Mexico included the plants in their Christmas celebrations. The star-shaped leaf pattern is said to symbolize the Star of Bethlehem, and the red color represents the blood sacrifice through the crucifixion of Jesus... There is a common misconception that the poinsettia is highly toxic. This is not true; it is mildly irritating to the skin or stomach and may sometimes cause diarrhea and vomiting if eaten. As with all Euphorbias, they bruise easily and give off a white 'milk' when broken, so those sensitive to latex may suffer an allergic reaction. I wish you all the very best, and thanx for all your kind words, time, comments, invites, faves. Very much appreciated. M, (*_*) For more of my other work or if you want to PURCHASE (ONLY PLACE TO BUY!), VIEW THE NEW PORTFOLIOS AND LATEST NEWS: http://www.indigo2photography.co.uk/magda-portfolio.htm Please do not use this image on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

POINSETTIA...THE COLOURS of THE SEASON.

Nowadays, like in everything, there are 'trends'? This year, hot pink trimmings seem to be the latest rage, the MUST HAVE! Me, I'm more traditional, green and red are THE colours for Christmas, of course with some silver and some gold, often white included, all depending on my creative mood... It probably originates in my childhood, but yes, to me, this is it! This Poinsettia is a Euphorbia pulcherrima. The plant's association with Christmas began in 16th century Mexico, where legend tells of a young girl who was too poor to provide a gift for the celebration of Jesus' birthday. The tale goes that the child was inspired by an angel to gather weeds from the roadside and place them in front of the church altar. Crimson "blossoms" sprouted from the weeds and became beautiful poinsettias. From the 17th century, Franciscan friars in Mexico included the plants in their Christmas celebrations. The star-shaped leaf pattern is said to symbolize the Star of Bethlehem, and the red colour represents the blood sacrifice through the crucifixion of Jesus... There is a common misconception that the poinsettia is highly toxic. This is not true; it is mildly irritating to the skin or stomach and may sometimes cause diarrhea and vomiting if eaten. As with all Euphorbias, they bruise easily and give off a white 'milk' when broken, so those sensitive to latex may suffer an allergic reaction. I wish you all the very best, and thanx for all your kind words, time, comments, invites, faves. Very much appreciated. M, (*_*) PLEASE READ THIS: MY PHOTOS ARE ONLY FOR SALE DIRECTLY FROM ME! For more of my other work or if you want to PURCHASE (ONLY PLACE TO BUY!), VIEW THE NEW PORTFOLIOS AND LATEST NEWS: http://www.indigo2photography.co.uk/magda-portfolio.htm Please do not use this image on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

A CHRISTMAS STAR... Poinsettia

THE COLOURS of CHRISTMAS... OPEN and view on black for the full impact! For December I'll upload images to do with the festive season. This is going to be many different things as you can see.. Now, like in everything, there are 'trends'? This year, hot pink trimmings seem to be the latest rage, the MUST HAVE! Me, I'm more traditional, green and red are THE colours for Christmas, of course with some silver and some gold, often white included, all depending on my creative mood... It probably originates in my childhood, but yes, to me, this is it! This Poinsettia is a Euphorbia pulcherrima. The plant's association with Christmas began in 16th century Mexico, where legend tells of a young girl who was too poor to provide a gift for the celebration of Jesus' birthday. The tale goes that the child was inspired by an angel to gather weeds from the roadside and place them in front of the church altar. Crimson "blossoms" sprouted from the weeds and became beautiful poinsettias. From the 17th century, Franciscan friars in Mexico included the plants in their Christmas celebrations. The star-shaped leaf pattern is said to symbolise the Star of Bethlehem, and the red colour represents the blood sacrifice through the crucifixion of Jesus... There is a common misconception that the poinsettia is highly toxic. This is not true; it is mildly irritating to the skin or stomach and may sometimes cause diarrhoea and vomiting if eaten. As with all Euphorbias, they bruise easily and give off a white 'milk' when broken, so those sensitive to latex may suffer an allergic reaction. I wish you all the very best, and thanx for all your kind words, time, comments, invites, faves. Very much appreciated. M, (*_*) PLEASE READ THIS: MY PHOTOS ARE ONLY FOR SALE DIRECTLY FROM ME! For more of my other work or if you want to PURCHASE (ONLY PLACE TO BUY!), VIEW THE NEW PORTFOLIOS AND LATEST NEWS: www.indigo2photography.com Please do not use this image on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

IT’S BEGINNING TO LOOK…

AB FAV for today… https://www.facebook.com/groups/1148438991917313/ A LOT LIKE CHRISTMAS? At Christmas, here in the Northern Hemisphere, our gardens and most plants are hibernating and invisible. So, what do we do, we bring plants inside, the shops are brimming with Poinsettias, large and small, red or white and pink. With Amaryllis and gorgeous bouquets with Winter-green and colour. The coloured bracts, which are most often flaming red but can be orange, pale green, cream, pink, white, or marbled—are often mistaken for flower petals because of their groupings and colours, but are actually leaves. They are already available in the shops,I don’t know about you, by the time it is Christmas, mine will be gone? I’m no good with them… Poinsettia is a Euphorbia pulcherrima. The plant's association with Christmas began in 16th century Mexico, where legend tells of a young girl who was too poor to provide a gift for the celebration of Jesus' birthday. The tale goes that the child was inspired by an angel to gather weeds from the roadside and place them in front of the church altar. Crimson "blossoms" sprouted from the weeds and became beautiful poinsettias. From the 17th century, Franciscan friars in Mexico included the plants in their Christmas celebrations. The star-shaped leaf pattern is said to symbolise the Star of Bethlehem, and the red colour represents the blood sacrifice through the crucifixion of Jesus...Where I come from, we call this a 'Christmas Star' There is a common misconception that the poinsettia is highly toxic. This is not true; it is mildly irritating to the skin or stomach and may sometimes cause diarrhoea and vomiting if eaten. As with all Euphorbias, they bruise easily and give off a white 'milk' when broken, so those sensitive to latex may suffer an allergic reaction. May your w-e and the coming days be full of goodness and joy, Magda (*_*) For more of my other work or if you want to PURCHASE (ONLY PLACE TO BUY MY IMAGES!), VIEW THE NEW PORTFOLIOS AND LATEST NEWS HERE on our website: www.indigo2photography.com IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

ONE POINSETTIA LEAF…

does not make Christmas… The French proverb ‘une hirondelle ne fait pas le Printemps’ is almost identical to its English equivalent "one swallow doesn't make a Summer" other than one glaring difference: the season. The coloured bracts, which are most often flaming red but can be orange, pale green, cream, pink, white, or marbled—are often mistaken for flower petals because of their groupings and colours, but are actually leaves. They are already available in the shops,I don’t know about you, by the time it is Christmas, mine will be gone? I’m no good with them… Poinsettia is a Euphorbia pulcherrima. The plant's association with Christmas began in 16th century Mexico, where legend tells of a young girl who was too poor to provide a gift for the celebration of Jesus' birthday. The tale goes that the child was inspired by an angel to gather weeds from the roadside and place them in front of the church altar. Crimson "blossoms" sprouted from the weeds and became beautiful poinsettias. From the 17th century, Franciscan friars in Mexico included the plants in their Christmas celebrations. The star-shaped leaf pattern is said to symbolise the Star of Bethlehem, and the red colour represents the blood sacrifice through the crucifixion of Jesus...Where I come from, we call this a 'Christmas Star' There is a common misconception that the poinsettia is highly toxic. This is not true; it is mildly irritating to the skin or stomach and may sometimes cause diarrhoea and vomiting if eaten. As with all Euphorbias, they bruise easily and give off a white 'milk' when broken, see the drop on the top, so those sensitive to latex may suffer an allergic reaction. May your w-e and the coming days be full of goodness and joy, Magda (*_*) For more of my other work or if you want to PURCHASE (ONLY PLACE TO BUY MY IMAGES!), VIEW THE NEW PORTFOLIOS AND LATEST NEWS HERE on our website: www.indigo2photography.com IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN (BY LAW!!!) TO USE ANY OF MY image or TEXT on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved